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GENI

The DOME Testbed became part of the NSF GENI Project.

The DOME GENI web site is http://geni.cs.umass.edu/dome/.

See our progress on the GENI Wiki.

The Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) is an experimental suite of infrastructure designed to support Network Science and Engineering experiments ranging from new research in network and distributed system design to the theoretical underpinnings of network science, network policy and economics, societal values, and the dynamic interactions of the physical and social spheres with communications networks.

As part of the Spiral 1 development effort, we have GENI-ized our DOME testbed, allowing external researchers to deploy experiments accross the DOME testbed, including the DieselNet vehicular testbed and the Amherst Community Internet mesh system.  A major part of that effort has been to integrate the Xen Virtual Machine to isolate experiments from experimental control, maintainance. and monitoring. The following figure shows an overview of our testbed integration.

 

 

 

Geni Engineering Conference 3 Poster:

GEC3 Poster

GEC3 Presentation:

News

Hamed Soroush, Nilanjan Banerjee, Aruna Balasubramanian, Mark D. Corner, Brian Neil Levine, and Brian Lynn. In Proc. ACM Intl. Workshop on Hot Topics of Planet-Scale Mobility Measurements (HotPlanet), June 2009. PDF
Aruna Balasubramanian, Brian Neil Levine, and Arun Venkataramani. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 18(2):596--609, April 2010. PDF.
Nilanjan Banerjee, Mark D. Corner, and Brian Neil Levine. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, 18(2):554--567, April 2010. PDF
Architecting Protocols to Enable Mobile Applications in Diverse Wireless Networks. Aruna Balasubramanian. PhD thesis, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, February 2011.
System support for perpetual mobile tracking Ph.D. Thesis. Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst
Improved Network Consistency and Connection in Mobile and Sensor Systems Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, September 2009 Winner of the 2009 UMass/Yahoo! Outstanding Dissertation Award!